Career Development: Seeking Joy & Carpe Diem



Via the Seattle PI:

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/159825_gist09.html

Still forming my thoughts on this one but it came out of the blue into my aggregator and I gotta tell you, it really hits home. I've been looking at the big picture for a few months now. Talking with valued colleagues and pondering the future.

Marilyn Gist writes:

Some describe the past two decades as years of rampant commercialism, materialism, and even greed in our country. The stock market rose in a seemingly endless climb, and we believed technology's promise of economic prosperity and improved quality of life. As consumers, we grabbed for the good life as much as we could. Today, we are seeing an important shift. Many have begun asking, "Is this all there is?" Surely, the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and subsequent world events have sobered our mood. The long recession also has curbed our expectations for instant gratification. Yet the question seems deeper -- it seems to come from the heart more than the head. We are awakening to the limits of what money can buy. We have learned firsthand that it does not buy happiness. Nor does it buy world peace.

We also suspect technology is a mixed blessing. It increases our options and our efficiency, sometimes fueling economic growth. However, technology also intensifies our pace of life so much that we now lack that irreplaceable resource: time. Without time, our quality of life suffers. We feel more stress. We struggle to balance family and work demands. We feel less connected to community, and we have limited opportunity for leisure activities and personal development. Yes, we have been successful, but many of us feel unsatisfied.

Technology is a mixed blessing. I love what I do...love the gadgets and stuff i get to mess with to help people learn and do their jobs better. Librarians have long discussed "technostress" in their work lives.... "infostress" too. I guess what I'm saying is I'm all about the untethered, techno-library type...I'm one myself....but I hope that person also balances out the rest of their life: love, family, spirit, health, joy.

Many of us think achievements at work are significant because we work very hard and stay very busy. Sometimes work achievements are significant, but work is a domain in which we can often confuse "success" and "busy-ness" with significance.

Frances Mayes wrote about being busy in Bella Tuscany . "I'm so busy..."

"Maybe living life is so important that we shouldn't be busy. At least not busy with that buzz buzz sound. Ed tells his students to figure out how many weekends they have left, given the good fortune of normal life expectancy. Even to the young it's a shock to see there are only 2800 more. That's it. Done for. Carpe Diem, Si, Si. Grab the Days."

Deep stuff this am.... now we'll return to a regularly scheduled program.

Posted: Mon - February 9, 2004 at 06:05 AM      


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